Multisensory food perception
Multisensory food perception

Traditionally, the five classic senses of vision, hearing, touch, smell, and taste have been studied in isolation by psychological and neuroscientific researchers. However, in the last few years, numerous examples of crossmodal interactions have been documented. This research has emphatically shown that even early sensory processing within a single sense is modulated by information in, and attention towards, the other senses.

We are particularly interested in questions relating to the role of attention in multisensory perception. Much of our work involves the investigation of multisensory illusions such as the 'rubber hand illusion' and ‘parchment-skin’ illusion. We are also interested in investigating how our understanding of multisensory perception can be used in a consumer psychology setting to improve the perception of everyday objects (i.e., foods and drinks). Additionally, we conduct research in other applied settings, such as studying the attentional limitations on our ability to talk on a mobile phone while attempting to drive a car. Finally, one area of growing interest in our laboratory concerns the temporal processing of information, and the synchronization of sensory signals.

Selected publications

Publications

List of publications (1991 - present). Here you will find a list of all our publications.

Visiting researchers

  • Harriet Dempsey-Jones, PhD student at University of Queensland
  • Charles Michel, Chef and researcher
  • Ann-Katrin Wesslein, PhD student at Trier University
  • Frank Mast, PhD student at Trier University
  • Nathan Van der Stoep, PhD student at Utrecht University
  • Prof. Jaewood Park, Chiba University of Commerce

 

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Industry Partnerships

We work with several partners in industry to apply what we know about basic perceptual interactions to real-world situations. Past projects have ranged from investigation of multimodal warning signals with Toyota to studies of colour-flavour interactions with Unilever. 

Related research themes