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Dorothy Bishop attended the Palace of Westminster on 24th October 2017 to present evidence to the Science and Technology Select Committee on research integrity. Dorothy was on a panel of academics who gave evidence at the inquiry on research integrity and the problem of reproducibility in science.

The Science and Technology Committee explores themes including the trends and drivers of problems with research integrity, the problem of reproducibility in science, and progress with implementing the Concordat on Research Integrity. This particular inquiry looks at trends and developments in fraud, misconduct and mistakes in research and the publication of research results.

The meeting is available to watch by clicking here or alternatively you can read the transcript here.

The written evidence by Lewandowsky and Bishop can be found here: http://data.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/committeeevidence.svc/evidencedocument/science-and-technology-committee/research-integrity/written/48611.html

 

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