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The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans is a genetic model organism linked to an impressive portfolio of fundamental discoveries in biology. This free-living nematode, which can be easily and inexpensively grown in the laboratory, is also a natural vehicle for screening for drugs that are active against nematode parasites. Here, we show that chemistry-to-gene screens using this animal model can define targets of antiparasitic drugs, identify novel candidate drug targets and contribute to the discovery of new drugs for treating human diseases.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/nrd1692

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nat Rev Drug Discov

Publication Date

04/2005

Volume

4

Pages

321 - 330

Keywords

Animals, Antinematodal Agents, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drug Design, Drug Resistance, Genes, Helminth, Models, Animal