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What is the relationship between memory and appetite? We explored this question by examining preferences for recently consumed food in patients with amnesia. Although the patients were unable to remember having eaten, and were inclined to eat multiple meals, we found that sensory-specific satiety was intact in these patients. The data suggest that sensory-specific satiety can occur in the absence of explicit memory for having eaten and that impaired sensory-specific satiety does not underlie the phenomenon of multiple-meal eating in amnesia. Overeating in amnesia may be due to disruption of learned control by physiological aftereffects of a recent meal or to problems utilizing internal cues relating to nutritional state.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02132.x

Type

Journal article

Journal

Psychol Sci

Publication Date

07/2008

Volume

19

Pages

623 - 628

Keywords

Amnesia, Brain, Energy Intake, Feeding Behavior, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Satiety Response, Sensation, Severity of Illness Index, Temporal Lobe