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The ability to rapidly and accurately recognize visual stimuli represents a significant computational challenge. Yet, despite such complexity, the primate brain manages this task effortlessly. How it does so remains largely a mystery. The study of visual perception and object recognition was once limited to investigations of brain-damaged individuals or lesion experiments in animals. However, in the last 25years, new methodologies, such as functional neuroimaging and advances in electrophysiological approaches, have provided scientists with the opportunity to examine this problem from new perspectives. This review highlights how some of these recent technological advances have contributed to the study of visual processing and where we now stand with respect to our understanding of neural mechanisms underlying object recognition.

Original publication




Journal article


Vision Res

Publication Date





782 - 799


Animals, Form Perception, Humans, Learning, Neurons, Primates, Visual Cortex