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The basic premise of biosemiotics as a discipline is that there are elementary processes linking signifying strategies in all forms of animate life. Correspondingly, the discoveries of biosemiotics should, in principle, be capable of revealing new insights about human signification. In the present article, I show that this is in fact the case by constructing a biosemiotic model that links advertising strategies with corresponding structures in animal predation. The methodological framework for this model is the catastrophe theory of René Thom. The end result is a revised understanding of an ostensibly cultural phenomenon that demonstrates its continuity with signalling processes conventionally associated with the natural world.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s12304-008-9020-6

Type

Journal article

Journal

Biosemiotics

Publisher

Springer

Publication Date

2008

Volume

1

Pages

313 - 327

Total pages

14

Keywords

Advertising, Biosemiotics, Catastrophe theory, René Thom