Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Previous studies have established that carriers of the low expression form of the serotonin transporter gene have an early attentional bias towards threatening relative to benign or positive information, in contrast to those with a high expression form of this gene. In the present study we extend this finding of a link between variation on the serotonin transporter gene and attentional bias to biases in the interpretation of emotional ambiguity. Specifically, a series of homophones were verbally presented (e.g., PAIN/PANE) and in line with research on attentional bias, participants with a low expression form of the serotonin transporter were more likely to select the threatening meaning more than those with a high expression form of the gene. This is the first evidence that variation on the serotonin transporter gene is correlated with interpretative bias and further strengthens the proposal that genetic variation, like processing bias, may play a role in the development and maintenance of emotional disorders. © 2012 Copyright Psychology Press Ltd.

Original publication

DOI

10.1080/20445911.2011.613821

Type

Journal article

Journal

Journal of Cognitive Psychology

Publication Date

01/02/2012

Volume

24

Pages

106 - 114