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Acquired disorders of language represent loss of previously acquired skills, usually with relatively specific impairments. In children with developmental disorders of language, we may also see selective impairment in some skills; but in this case, the acquisition of language or literacy is affected from the outset. Because systems for processing spoken and written language change as they develop, we should beware of drawing too close a parallel between developmental and acquired disorders. Nevertheless, comparisons between the two may yield new insights. A key feature of connectionist models simulating acquired disorders is the interaction of components of language processing with each other and with other cognitive domains. This kind of model might help make sense of patterns of comorbidity in developmental disorders. Meanwhile, the study of developmental disorders emphasizes learning and change in underlying representations, allowing us to study how heterogeneity in cognitive profile may relate not just to neurobiology but also to experience. Children with persistent language difficulties pose challenges both to our efforts at intervention and to theories of learning of written and spoken language. Future attention to learning in individuals with developmental and acquired disorders could be of both theoretical and applied value.

Original publication

DOI

10.1098/rstb.2012.0403

Type

Journal article

Journal

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci

Publication Date

2014

Volume

369

Keywords

aphasia, cognitive neuropsychology, connectionist models, development, dyslexia, specific language impairment, Cognition, Executive Function, Humans, Language Development Disorders, Language Disorders, Models, Neurological, Models, Psychological, Verbal Learning