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BACKGROUND/AIMS: The younger individuals quit smoking, the greater the health benefits. We studied the role of adolescent and concurrent psychological, social and familial factors in successful tobacco cessation in a general population sample of French young adults. METHODS: Our data came from participants of the TEMPO cohort study and their parents (members of the GAZEL cohort study) in France. Among regular smokers (n = 678), Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios of self-reported tobacco cessation of at least 12 months in relation to individual and socioenvironmental variables. RESULTS: On average, participants (mean: 28.9 years) smoked for 10.51 years (SD = 5.9); the majority had attempted to quit smoking at least once (59.5%). In multiple regression analyses, cannabis use in the preceding year and recent financial difficulties were both negatively associated with successful smoking cessation. Conversely, living with a partner and, for women only, recent pregnancy or childbirth were associated with an increased likelihood of tobacco cessation. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the importance of young adults' cannabis use, family situation and socioeconomic context with regard to their smoking behavior. Physicians and public health decision makers aiming to decrease the burden of tobacco smoking should take into consideration these social and behavioral factors.

Original publication




Journal article


Eur Addict Res

Publication Date





153 - 159


Adult, Cohort Studies, Family Characteristics, Female, France, Humans, Male, Marijuana Smoking, Multivariate Analysis, Pregnancy, Proportional Hazards Models, Residence Characteristics, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Social Environment, Tobacco Use Cessation, Young Adult