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Exposure to nonionizing radiation used in wireless communication remains a contentious topic in the public mind-while the overwhelming scientific evidence to date suggests that microwave and radio frequencies used in modern communications are safe, public apprehension remains considerable. A recent article in Child Development has caused concern by alleging a causative connection between nonionizing radiation and a host of conditions, including autism and cancer. This commentary outlines why these claims are devoid of merit, and why they should not have been given a scientific veneer of legitimacy. The commentary also outlines some hallmarks of potentially dubious science, with the hope that authors, reviewers, and editors might be better able to avoid suspect scientific claims.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/cdev.13013

Type

Journal article

Journal

Child Dev

Publication Date

01/2018

Volume

89

Pages

141 - 147