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Catharina Zich

Research Assistant


Currently I am investigating emotion regulation networks in adolescences by means of real-time fMRI-based neurofeedback. Before joining the Brain Train Consortium, I conducted my PhD research on individual and age-related differences of motor imagery signatures by using EEG-based neurofeedback embedded in simultaneous EEG-fMRI and EEG-fNIRS recordings at the Neuropsychology Lab, University of Oldenburg (supervised by Stefan Debener and Cornelia Kranczoich). During this time I also visited the Cohen Kadosh Lab, where I evaluated the potential of tDCS to modulate the neural lateralisation of motor imagery in older adults. I completed my B.A. in 'Philosophy-Neuroscience-Cognition' at the University of Magdeburg and my M.S.c in 'Neurocognitive Psychology' at the University of Oldenburg. 

Research Summary

In my research, I investigate how neurofeedback can be used to regulate ones brain activity to modulate brain networks and behavioural indices. One aspect of my work focuses on EEG-based neurofeedback controlled by means of motor imagery by healthy elderly adults and chronic stroke patients aiming to facilitate motor recovery after stroke. A second aspect is addressing the effect of real-time fMRI-based neurofeedback on emotion regulation in adolescents. I tackle these topics by using high-density EEG, mobile EEG, tDCS and fMRI, as well as concurrent EEG-fMRI and concurrent EEG-fNIRS recordings. Understanding the underpinnings of neurofeedback is highly relevant to tailor neurofeedback applications for clinical use. 

Awards & Grants

Muck-Weymann Award, German Society for Biofeedback 2015

Stipend of the G.-A.-Lienert Foundation 2015

Best Student Paper/Talk Award, 6th International Brain-Computer Interface Conference 2014, Graz

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Recent Publications


Talk at the BCI 2016 Meeting - Lateralization patterns for movement execution and imagination investigated