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  • Touch, taste, & smell user interfaces: The future of multisensory HCI

    3 July 2018

    © 2016 Authors. The senses we call upon when interacting with technology are very restricted. We mostly rely on vision and audition, increasingly harnessing touch, whilst taste and smell remain largely underexploited. In spite of our current knowledge about sensory systems and sensory devices, the biggest stumbling block for progress concerns the need for a deeper understanding of people's multisensory experiences in HCI. It is essential to determine what tactile, gustatory, and olfactory experiences we can design for, and how we can meaningfully stimulate such experiences when interacting with technology. Importantly, we need to determine the contribution of the different senses along with their interactions in order to design more effective and engaging digital multisensory experiences. Finally, it is vital to understand what the limitations are that come into play when users need to monitor more than one sense at a time. The aim of this workshop is to deepen and expand the discussion on touch, taste, and smell within the CHI community and promote the relevance of multisensory experience design and research in HCI.

  • Revealing hidden states in visual working memory using electroencephalography.

    3 July 2018

    It is often assumed that information in visual working memory (vWM) is maintained via persistent activity. However, recent evidence indicates that information in vWM could be maintained in an effectively "activity-silent" neural state. Silent vWM is consistent with recent cognitive and neural models, but poses an important experimental problem: how can we study these silent states using conventional measures of brain activity? We propose a novel approach that is analogous to echolocation: using a high-contrast visual stimulus, it may be possible to drive brain activity during vWM maintenance and measure the vWM-dependent impulse response. We recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while participants performed a vWM task in which a randomly oriented grating was remembered. Crucially, a high-contrast, task-irrelevant stimulus was shown in the maintenance period in half of the trials. The electrophysiological response from posterior channels was used to decode the orientations of the gratings. While orientations could be decoded during and shortly after stimulus presentation, decoding accuracy dropped back close to baseline in the delay. However, the visual evoked response from the task-irrelevant stimulus resulted in a clear re-emergence in decodability. This result provides important proof-of-concept for a promising and relatively simple approach to decode "activity-silent" vWM content using non-invasive EEG.

  • Processes of Emotional Meaning and Response Coordination

    3 July 2018

    © Oxford University Press 2014. All rights reserved. When and how are meaning processes involved in unfolding emotions? This chapter evaluates answers to this question provided by contemporary psychological theory, distinguishing approaches that see emotions as meanings attached to behavioural episodes after the fact, as responses to prior meanings extracted from personenvironment transactions, and as actions that serve to communicate meanings to others. A fourth alternative is to see meaning as emergent rather than integrative, coordinative, or intended. Emotions are not only determinate responses to separately defined meanings or communicative acts driven by internal goals, but also situated adjustments to unfolding events and active ways of transforming or producing meaning in collaboration with other people. Further, emotional meaning can be seen as an activity performed by interactants rather than an integrated piece of cognitive content (a thought or mental representation). In emotion, "meaning" should be read as verb as well as noun.