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The default mode network (DMN) of the brain consists of areas that are typically more active during rest than during active task performance. Recently however, this network has been shown to be activated by certain types of tasks. Social cognition, particularly higher-order tasks such as attributing mental states to others, has been suggested to activate a network of areas at least partly overlapping with the DMN. Here, we explore this claim, drawing on evidence from meta-analyses of functional MRI data and recent studies investigating the structural and functional connectivity of the social brain. In addition, we discuss recent evidence for the existence of a DMN in non-human primates. We conclude by discussing some of the implications of these observations. © 2012 Mars, Neubert, Noonan, Sallet, Toni and Rushworth.

Original publication

DOI

10.3389/fnhum.2012.00189

Type

Journal article

Journal

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Publication Date

21/06/2012

Pages

1 - 9