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Photo collage from the event. Five photos showing speakers, audience members, display materials

On Saturday 8th October, the Translational Neuropsychology group, led by Professor Nele Demeyere, hosted a public engagement event at the North Oxford Community Centre in Summertown. The main purpose was to share some initial results of the Stroke Association funded priority programme into long term psychological consequences of stroke. Over the last 3 years more than 100 participants completed several sessions of in-depth neuropsychological profiling and questionnaires around mood, apathy, sleep at two timepoints one year apart. They also wore an activity monitor for a week.  The researchers presented some initial findings from the study as a first sneak peak to the people who had made it happen. This was followed with many questions from the audience and a discussion on where to take the research next.

Trevor, a stroke survivor who is part of the research management group, presented his experience of being involved in research.  Jeremy, another stroke survivor, then talked about wider governance and his experience being involved in the grants and funding side of stroke research.  Finally,  Dr Mel Fleming talked about new and ongoing research on sleep and motivation and members of the Translational Neuropsychology, and Neuroplastics research teams were there to demonstrate some of the tasks and apps. The event was further supported by local stroke charities, with a strong community feel.

Find out more HERE

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