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Professor Charles Spence of the Experimental Psychology Crossmodal Research Laboratory has written an article for The Conversation on how to make your meals more memorable, and that means no food should be served on a plate with a right angle.

The past few years have seen an explosive rise in the popularity of food being plated in ever stranger and more unusual ways. What started with the world’s top modernist restaurants serving food from flowerpots (Noma, Copenhagen) and off plates resembling the seashore (The Fat Duck, Bray) has now percolated through to the local gastropub and cocktail bar. Take a trip out to the latter and you may well find your dinner served on a flat cap or shovel or your drink presented in a Wellington boot.

 

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