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Layla Rashid

DPhil Candidate

Research Overview

Layla Rashid is a DPhil student in the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford. Layla’s work is funded by the 1+3 ESRC Grand Union Doctoral Training Programme. Her work in the TOPIC Research Group and oRANGE lab focuses on exploring the relationship between child adversity and the impact this has on later psychopathology. Her research integrates methods from social epidemiology, clinical and developmental psychology to guide and adapt treatment interventions by identifying protective factors that promote positive psychopathology among vulnerable and at-risk populations.

Particularly, her DPhil is focused on adapting a guided parent-led psychological intervention for refugee parents to help identify and meet the mental health needs of their young children.

Biography

Layla completed her MSc in Psychological Research at the University of Oxford and was awarded a distinction, winning the best MSc Academic Poster Prize. Her thesis explored maternal bereavement and early adulthood mental health, considering the role of modifiable parental factors. 

Layla has various experience in psychiatric in-patient and out-patient settings including perinatal, treatment, eating disorders, psychiatric intensive care units, and assessment wards as well as telephone crisis lines. Layla has worked with various charities including her role as a Community Development Manager at the Young Gamers and Gamblers Education Trust and across various research institutions including the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge.