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Researchers from the new Wellcome Trust Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging (WIN) have attracted significant new funding.

Nils Kolling has won a BBSRC Future Leader Fellowship to investigate the neural mechanisms of flexibility, motivation and learning in ecological environments. The Future Leader fellowships are designed to support the transition of early stage researchers to fully independent research leaders. Nils will be moving over to the Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity to take up this award

Meanwhile, Laurence Hunt, has been awarded a Sir Henry Dale Fellowship to study 'Neural circuitry and neurochemistry of decision-making'. Laurence has a dual appointment between the Nuffield Dept of Clinical Neurosciences and the Dept. of Psychiatry, and is part of the WIN. The fellowship is jointly funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Royal Society.

The WIN, led by Heidi Johansen-Berg, is a multi-disciplinary neuroimaging research facility which encompasses the Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity (OHBA, Department of Psychiatry) and imaging facilities within the Department of Experimental Psychology.

It focuses on the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for neuroscience research, along with related technologies such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, MEG and EEG.

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